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Posts for: January, 2017

By Dewitt Family Dentistry
January 24, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
CouldaMetalAllergyKeepYouFromGettingaDentalImplant

The dental implant is the closest thing in modern dentistry to a natural tooth. This is because an implant replaces more than the visible crown — it also replaces the root, thanks to a metal post imbedded in the bone.

But what if you have a metal allergy — are you out of luck replacing a tooth with an implant? Before answering this question, let's take a closer look at metal allergies.

An allergy is an overreaction of the body's immune system to a particular foreign substance. This response can be as inconsequential as a minor rash or as life-threatening as a shutdown of the body's organ systems. You can be allergic to anything, including metals.

Usually, these allergies are to specific kinds of metals. For example, about 17% of women and 3% of men are allergic to nickel, while smaller percentages are allergic to cobalt or chromium. Most allergic reactions to metal occur from external contact with jewelry or similar metal items that create rashes or other anomalies on the skin. On a more serious note, an allergy to metal in a body replacement part could result in the body rejecting it.

Metals have also played an important role in dental care, particularly dental amalgam used for tooth fillings. Dental amalgam is a mixture of a precious metal like gold or silver with other metals like copper, tin and, in small amounts, mercury. While dental amalgam has been used safely for decades, there have been rare cases of inflammation or rashes.

This brings us to dental implants and the most common metal used in them, titanium. The commercial version of this metal is highly prized in medical and dental applications because it has a special affinity with bone. Bone cells readily grow and adhere to the metal, which strengthens the bond between the implant and the jawbone.

Even if you have a rare allergy to certain metals, it's even rarer that would include titanium. In one particular study of 1,500 implant patients less than 1% reported any reaction at all.

If you're concerned, you can undergo testing to see if you react to titanium. More than likely, though, you'll be able to join the millions of other patients who have successfully restored their smiles with dental implants.

If you would like more information on dental implants as a tooth replacement option, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Metal Allergies to Dental implants.”


By Dewitt Family Dentistry
January 09, 2017
Category: Oral Health
ActorDavidRamseySaysDontForgettoFloss

Can you have healthy teeth and still have gum disease? Absolutely! And if you don’t believe us, just ask actor David Ramsey. The cast member of TV hits such as Dexter and Arrow said in a recent interview that up to the present day, he has never had a single cavity. Yet at a routine dental visit during his college years, Ramsey’s dentist pointed out how easily his gums bled during the exam. This was an early sign of periodontal (gum) disease, the dentist told him.

“I learned that just because you don’t have cavities, doesn’t mean you don’t have periodontal disease,” Ramsey said.

Apparently, Ramsey had always been very conscientious about brushing his teeth but he never flossed them.

“This isn’t just some strange phenomenon that exists just in my house — a lot of people who brush don’t really floss,” he noted.

Unfortunately, that’s true — and we’d certainly like to change it. So why is flossing so important?

Oral diseases such as tooth decay and periodontal disease often start when dental plaque, a bacteria-laden film that collects on teeth, is allowed to build up. These sticky deposits can harden into a substance called tartar or calculus, which is irritating to the gums and must be removed during a professional teeth cleaning.

Brushing teeth is one way to remove soft plaque, but it is not effective at reaching bacteria or food debris between teeth. That’s where flossing comes in. Floss can fit into spaces that your toothbrush never reaches. In fact, if you don’t floss, you’re leaving about a third to half of your tooth surfaces unclean — and, as David Ramsey found out, that’s a path to periodontal disease.

Since then, however, Ramsey has become a meticulous flosser, and he proudly notes that the long-ago dental appointment “was the last we heard of any type of gum disease.”

Let that be the same for you! Just remember to brush and floss, eat a good diet low in sugar, and come in to the dental office for regular professional cleanings.

If you would like more information on flossing or periodontal disease, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Understanding Gum (Periodontal) Disease.”


By Dewitt Family Dentistry
January 01, 2017
Category: Oral Health
HelpDe-StressYourChildsDentalVisitswiththeseTips

Regular dental visits are just as important for healthy teeth and gums as daily brushing and flossing. Not only will these visits reduce the amount of hidden or hard to reach bacterial plaque (the main source of dental disease), but they'll also boost the chances problems with teeth and gums are caught early and treated.

A lifetime habit of dental visits should begin around your child's first birthday, but children can be stressed or even frightened by trips to the dentist. This could stick with them, causing them to avoid regular dental visits when they become adults. The absence of professional dental care could prove hazardous to their dental health.

Here then are some things you can do to “de-stress” your child's dental visits.

Begin and sustain regular visits early. By not waiting a few years after age one, your child has a better chance of viewing it and subsequent visits as a normal part of life.

Choose a “kid-friendly” dentist. A pediatric dentist is trained not only for dental issues specific to children, but also in creating a comfortable environment for them. Some general dentists are also skilled with children, taking the time to talk and play with them first to ease any anxiety.

Stay calm yourself. Perhaps you've discovered, often in an embarrassing fashion, that your children are watching you and taking cues on how to act and react. Be sure then to project a sense of ease and a “nothing to this” attitude, rather than nervousness or anxiety. Your child will follow your lead.

Set the example. Speaking of following your lead, your children will intuitively pick up whether you're serious about your own dental health, which could influence them. So be sure you practice what you preach: daily oral hygiene, a dental-friendly diet and, of course, your own regular visits to the dentist. Your actions about your own dental care really will speak louder than words.

If you would like more information on effective dental care for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Taking the Stress out of Dentistry for Kids.”